Tag Archives: mayan

A Mayan Exploration

11 Mar

About an hour and a half drive from Bacalar is the town of Xpujil. Like many Mexican villages, it is situated on a major highway. Highway 186 connects east (the Bay of Chetumal) and west (the Gulf of Mexico) at the base of the Yucatan Peninsula and in the heart of one of the most advanced ancient civilization on the planet, the Mayan people. 

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One of numerous sites in the town itself. The similarities to Tikal in Guatemala are evident.

I can’t imagine what it’s like growing up with pyramids down the street. Many children in Bacalar have never been out on the Laguna. Do the children of Xpujil study their ancestors? One can only hope.

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Calakmul is a huge site. We drove forty miles down a bumpy road. Tour buses are not allowed.

We spent three days and traveled to four amazing sites in close proximity. There is so much to be learned about the massive civilization that connects Mexico with Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras. We truly live in an area rich in culture and history.

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Wild turkeys that looked more like peacocks, air plants and passageways to the underworld. Monkeys were swinging overhead.

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These three-dimensional friezes were well protected. I could have spent days studying them.

We would like to return to this area in the future. There was way more to digest than three days allowed. Also scroll down to see the bats! A genuine bat cave where a vortex of bats headed into the jungle at sunset to consume mosquitoes. They gave the Austin bats a run for their money. Truly an awesome experience. DOS TORTAS

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Turn Here

26 Feb

On our way to Merida for the watercoloring adventure, Rendezvous 2017, our little band of travels got hungry and began looking for a place to stop. It is a long drive and we had set out early from Bacalar. Casually making a turn off the highway in search of a little village eatery, we were quite astounded at what we found.

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The pyramids of Mayapan were not 100 feet off the highway. We had all traveled the route to Merida many times oblivious that this ancient village was hidden behind the trees.

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Mexico is like that. Make a wrong turn or a right turn and step into a whole other world.

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A winged bird-human.

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Posing with a giant carved mask.

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My friend Yolanda made the climb to the top of the largest pyramid. We were so amazed at how many times we’d unknowingly passed these pyramids.

We spent a brief time climbing the pyramids and taking pictures, with promises to return when we had more time. I never tire of learning about the Mayan people who lived in the Yucatán so many years ago.

DOS TORTAS

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A House Full Of Goddesses

18 Sep

After spending my junior year attending college in Mexico (In The Beginning), I became enamored of goddesses. It was clear that they played an important role in Mesoamerica. They were the bringers of rain, corn and yes, babies.

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Coatlique – Aztec mother of the gods. (Stock foto) This is an immense statue I visited in 1973 at the Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City.

In the nineties  Lisa and I visited Isla Mujeres, the Island of Women, off the coast of Cancun and the site of worship to the goddess Ixcel (E shell). Young Mayan women travelled by canoe to ask for her blessing in pregnancy and childbirth.

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The site of the temple on a great cliff overlooking the Caribbean.

In 2014, while on our honeymoon, we went to Cozumel and the temple of Ixcel to petition on behalf of our daughter, who now has a beautiful son. The temple was a pilgrimage site, sanctuary, and school of midwifery for the ancients. (Home Sweet Home Bacalar MX)

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Our lovely daughter carries son Max on a trip to New Orleans

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The goddess Ixcel carrying her youngster sits on our kitchen counter in Bacalar.

Our art collection has grown during our travels (Show And Tell Art Purchases) and filled our house with goddesses.

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A high born Mayan woman holding an obsidian mirror. The original is quite diminutive.

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You needed a goddess on your side when birthing in ancient times.

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The goddess of sexual indiscretions. And I thought she was the goddess of weaving haha.

Painted by our friend Jo Mann.

Our history rarely includes herstory. Goddess images are labeled fertility icons, as if that is all women are concerned with. On every continent, strong, powerful images of women have been uncovered. It’s fun to invite some of them to share our home.

DOS TORTAS

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